Monthly Colorado Gardening Chores

UPDATED and REPUBLISHED on May 30, 2015

Garden tools in wheelbarrow

I have a love/hate relationship with monthly Colorado gardening chores. There are days when I’m out there sweating and grunting and thinking, “Why do I do this?” Then other days I love the hard work. I always love planting seeds and pruning and harvesting. But I don’t always love hauling dirt, mowing or turning over hard clay soil. But, ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

This is a new page for Colorado Backyard Gardener. Over the next year I will add to it, making suggestions and adding the ones you give me to this month-to-month chore guide. It will be particular to Colorado, what chores us Front Range gardeners typically do in any given month.

As I add to this page, I will work to keep it arranged and organized in a manner that is accessible to my readers. For now, scroll down to the month you need.

Nasturtiums And Colorado

Nasturtiums and Colorado go great together. I see them all over our state. They do well up in higher elevations and well on the Front Range. Here in Colorado (and elsewhere), Nasturtiums are a gardener’s dream. They are virtually carefree once established.Β  I was introduced to this beauty by my friend Nancy. The summer of 2007, while a summer of grief over the loss of my sister Leslie, was also a summer to discover my love for this cheerful plant. If you are in grief, there will be new joys that come along. The garden reminds me of this truth and helps remind me of my rooted hope.

The funniest thing about the nasturtium is that it likes old soil. It does not do well in soil that has been amended with nutrients and fertilizers. Best thing to do is to use soil that you have had in another pot for years. Use that old dirt and stick some seeds in that pot. Yes, please use seeds. I would not recommend transplanting nasturtiums. Instead, I recommend getting your pots filled with other annual flowers and your beds all planted. Then go around and stick nasturtium seeds in empty spots. Also take an empty pot or two and just fill it with seeds. And then watch then sprout. Be patient as they can take upwards of two weeks to germinate. Do all this once the threat of frost is past. Nasturtiums and Colorado only go great together once it has warmed up a bit.

I like to